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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)
improved the lives of americans. you may think about... go to just picking up 20 percent of government or making more or providing efficiency in the government and doing lots of that. there are a lot more things happening across the board that were driving forward. but the important part of this is really thinking about outside of the government. how will we have an impact in the lives of americans in so many profound ways. and it is not only easy to connect the dots between how we are using technology inside government. and how we are fostering a culture of government going forward related to how young women are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like every time that we have such disruption in this country. and this time... the financial down turn and t
city government into the business of making home loans. this is part of what brought on the economic crisis at the federal level, fannie mae and freddie mac giving out home loans to people who couldn't afford to buy and later had their houses foreclosed. we don't know what's going to happen in the housing market for the next 30 years. i think it's foolish to set aside increasing set amounts of money for the next 3 decades when we know right now that there's thousands of people living on the streets. why not just build as many affordable units now as possible and do that by getting government out of the way with all its red tape and regulations and taxes and union work rules that increase the cost of housing. that would be a better way to get affordable housing, not bringing back this redevelopment agency with its legacy of driving african americans out of the fillmore and they had slated more than half the bay area for redevelopment before they were shut down. >> anything you'd like to add, peter? >> there's a number of assertions from my opponent that are based in a misunderstand
to see how your government works directly, c-span is the only place to go. >> until a few months ago, charles haldeman of freddie mac. he began the job in 2096 months after the company was taken over by the federal government. mr. haldeman spoke about the housing market and financial regulations at the john f. kennedy school of government. this is just under an hour. >> i'm a member of the faculty here at the kennedy school at a romani school of business and government. it's a pleasure to welcome all of you to this year's lecture, which is funded by nasd, which is now in the, the private broker of the u.s. industry. the focus is on financial regulation and each year we have had a leading public official responsible in some ways for u.s. regulation. this year, our speaker is a tiny bit of a stretch, but not really much at all. ed haldeman was ceo of freddie mac from a 2009 to just a few months ago. while in that role, ed was not really a formal regulator. he was responsible for running a very large public financial institution. freddie mac and its sibling, fannie mae are what are call
government culture that the potential benefits to the san francisco community that have been raised, not just by us, are more than ignored. they are mocked by a city administration fearing change. we believe that only the mayor can make the changes that we and others have proposed. no one else has the direct authority over government operations than he has. he can do it if he is willing to put the passionate leadership he puts in attracting tech business to the city and improving the organization and technology within san francisco government. perhaps we have to wait for a different administration for there to be a fair hearing on ways to improve technology. perhaps you, the board of supervisors, can take up this challenge. we hope you will. there was a better ending to our title report, deja vu all over again. that is "where there is a will there is a way .". thank you. >> thank you for the time and effort put into that report. any questions right now president chiu. all right. with that i would like to ask the mayor's office to come up. cindy is here representing the mayor'
as possible and do that by getting government out of the way with all its red tape and regulations and taxes and union work rules that increase the cost of housing. that would be a better way to get affordable housing, not bringing back this redevelopment agency with its legacy of driving african americans out of the fillmore and they had slated more than half the bay area for redevelopment before they were shut down. >> anything you'd like to add, peter? >> there's a number of assertions from my opponent that are based in a misunderstanding how affordable housing works in san francisco in this particular measure. unfortunately there's not enough time to tackle all of them, but i want to make clear this is not subsidizing middle income home owners. this is going to go primarily for low and very low householders in san francisco. that has always been the programmatic focus because you can leverage funding. we live in a high income market and that is exactly why we have an affordable sector in this city. when it comes it recreating redevelopment, that's a fallacy. it's about recognizing t
works for city governments. gordon feller, michael littlejohn and you have heard from carla. it is very hard to moderate. all i want to do is tweet. i wanted to start with a question that really build off presentation. this can be a very broad conversation. we are talking about efficiency and how we manage congestion and lower energies. we are talking about the integration of data. we are talking about participation was social media, co-production of solution. david mentioned this. the united states is not quite at the vanguard of this. when i think it can just in, i think about singapore. he brought the copenhagen. i want to start with the ibm and cisco part of the world appeared word you see progress within cities? where is the u.s. -- part of the world. where do you see progress within cities? where in the u.s.? >> we can point to smarter transportation and public safety and health care. that is not necessarily a smarter city. as marchers city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, -- a smarter city, and it was alluded to a number of times this morning, is a city of t
's start with you, supervisor. thanks for having me. proposition d is a good government measure that will increase voter turnout in our elections for city attorney and treasurer, two very important offices, and will also save the city 4.2 million dollars every 4 years. right now we elect our city attorney and treasurer in a very, very low turnout odd year election where they are the only two offices on the ballot. and turnout is always extremely low in that election. and it costs us over $4 million dollars to hold that election. proposition d would move the city attorney and treasurer elections to be on the same ballot as the mayor, which is a much myer turn jut election, so more people would be voting for city attorney and treasurer and every time we don't hold that very low turnout odd year election separately for city attorney and treasurer, we'll save 4.2 million dollars. prop d was put on the ballot unanimously by the board of supervisors and it's been endorsed overwhelmingly by both the democratic and republican party. >> dr. faulkner, do you think this is a good idea. >>
you sir. >> there are three parts of the economy, the consumer, the investment and the government. the only reason thing that has grown on a rapid rate is the government. the government gets their revenues through taxation or borrowing money. the problem is the regulations are hurting small businesses. 2/3 of all jobs are created by small business which are considered -- chapter s corporations and less than $250,000 killing all of the regulations and kill the incentive. the government doesn't produce anything. it's the private sector that produces the wealth and the opportunity. get the government off the back through regulations and taxation and you will see the city once again be vibrant. i'm telling you it's taxation and regulations. i have two successful businesses. i would not open another one in san francisco. i would not. >> thank you. mr. yee. >> here's the four things i would do to create jobs. number one, help the small businesses with a one stot shop approach. ocean avenue had a fire. nine businesses had a fire and the mayor came and if he could do that one t
government. it's not sexy, but it's what we need. professionally i'm a cartographer. san francisco department and the environment, law firms, national park service and many more. i'm a father, a husband, a homeowner. our daughter is a fifth generation san franciscan. my lifelong record of volunteerism is one major way i stand out among the other candidates. while living in the dorms at san francisco state i started and ran the recycling program which reaches over 5,000 campus residents. after moving off campus i delivered thousands of meals for project open hand and tutored literacy to adults. enteredctionv a -- supervisor elsbernd appointed me, i worked with sfpd, play guitar, give blood several times a year, and going over this list, hoping to demonstrate to you my core belief in civic duty and community involvement. i also believe that the next step in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has co
it because that is your life. >> thank you for joining us tonight. i am the government policy director at spur. it is my distinct pleasure to welcome such an amazing panel as well as the mayor of our fine city. this is the innovation mayor, mayor ed lee. [applause] >> thank you. can everyone here me? welcome to spur. i enjoy being here because every time i come here, some part of my brain wakes up that has not been woken up before. i am here to welcome you. earlier, i had a wonderful opportunity to exchange with our panel members about what they are doing and how they're doing it. . i think these panel members are here as part of their own entrepreneurial spirit. they own companies but love the city. they know the spirit of the city is one of innovation, that invites peoples and views, and smashes them -- meshes them together to see if we can make an even better san francisco. we have two other supervisors who may be coming later. we're all part of the initial group of policymakers at city hall who want to hear news views and ideas on the new collaborative economy. we're interested in
in my ability to contribute is to help govern as supervisor. now just a few of the many important issues. we are in economic straits and need to be conservative with our finances now and for the future. pension, salary and benefit reform has come a long way, but we need to do more. let's work with all stakeholders to assure that rules are based on fairness and financial realism for all, not for the personal enrichment of a few. i would rewrite the public flaping rules which are costing the city millions. why should a candidate receive up to 150,000 city tax dollars then spend that money on consultants in walnut creek or in san jose which is being done now? i'm not one of the quarter million dollars candidates but i've raised several thousand dollars, buttons, website, campaign essentials all produced here in san francisco. homelessness and panhandling, when friends visit from out of town they are aghast at the number of people on the streets. some are truly destitute. on the other end of the spectrum, some have homes. compassion, resources and outreach are crucial, but we also need city
incredibly involved in trying to help the u.s. government think more intelligently about competitiveness and entrepreneurship in particular. then josh linkner, a local star here who runs detroit venture partners as i'm sure many of you know, if you're from detroit, you certainly know that, a supporter of this event which we're very grateful for, and i think symbolic of the incredible new energy that's developing in detroit. and i should also say that josh created a company calls eprize in 1999 here in detroit. it's been operating all this time. two weeks ago it sold for a nice exit. [applause] so here's the story of a local company that came from here, went all the way and, you know, he's done real well with that. meanwhile, he's invested in a ton of other companies. so i just want to start by asking you, steve, you know, when i told you about this, you immediately dropped it. why did you think techonomy detroit was a good idea? >> well, i think it's a great idea. i think it's great you're willing to shine a spotlight on detroit. it's not just about detroit, the story about entrepreneurs
the economy on an annual basis it does not work, so we need to talk about the past. one is more government control. >> senator, your response. >> first, i want to thank the networks and my family, my wife of 35 years, my daughter, and my other daughter, and 60% of the grand kids are here. it is good to have james here. jobs are critically important, and i think if you take a look at what is wrong with washington, d.c. compan, there a long list of people. the jobs bill as a prime example that you brought up. it is interesting the gentleman i am running with is hyper partisan. he mentioned rosa, and she has gotten off hold of me and said he has not been much of the health on the subcommittee, and quite frankly, what needs to be done is people need to work together as americans. is when doesion thi politics trump jobs? is it when clean air or clean water is at stake or perhaps politics? >> the answer is jobs, and we need to create an environment in washington, d.c., where we are working together. we are trying to create an environment of working together. it is a political year. of course she
about government covering their health-care costs. i am on medicare now, certainly the government takes my. when i was working, you have no idea how many times, because i was the person who put the insurance payments into the computer when i came to the hospital, and you have no idea how the insurance companies to turn down a thing this. host: even though they make their comments known about the presidential race, we are focusing on cost and said races in your state. a couple of stories, at this one out of new york when it comes to hurricane sandy, federal money do not up to states and hurricane aftermath, the first trickle of federal funds start to go out. 29 million to rebuild highways. $30 million to hire temporary workers to help with the cleanup. it is certainly to the multibillion dollar bill for the government. the federal office has 7.5 billion to spend. an additional 5 billion could be made available withinan offsets required in other government programs. that is in the new york times. when it comes to how the money is concerned, this out of the new york post. the state labor d
why it's important to streamline the process at city hall. i have also held government accountable, both as a journalist and in my social justice work at the aclu. i'll hold government accountable again. this time from inside city hall. san francisco is a city of neighborhoods which is why it's important that your supervisor pay attention to what our neighborhoods need. i want to focus on kids and families. too many are moving away from san francisco. we need them. that's why i want to make sure our parks are centered on recreation for kids, families and pets. we need more affordable middle class housing for families and most important, we need neighborhood schools so you can walk your kids to. and everyone on the block goes to the same school, neighbors know each other. they can bond. it's the best way to build a strong community. i went to public schools and state college which equipped me for many opportunities in life. i was fortunate to receive a full scholarship to harvard where i recently completed a master's degree in public administration. i'll work hard to apply the publi
: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is a 1/4" storm. lichte: over a year's period, 16 billion gallons' wo
rehearsed emergency response protocols by many institutions and government. there is a collective sense of denial too about how poorly presented the city is for events of this scale. how poorly prepared have we been, steve? >> well, very, especially about flood waters. irene, tropical storm irene was only six months ago and the water, you remember, washed right up to the top of the battery but didn't come over. it wasn't hard to image then what a surge of ten or 11 or 12 feet higher might have done. and yet, it seems, and we'll have time to sort all of this south when we get through this emergency, that vy little was done to protect underground infrastructure from a very predictable surge. first of all. second of all, the extent to which the transportation and power system were vulnerable to this kind of weather, was known for ten years, predicted. again it's not clear that either in the private sector or the public sector, the city was illingo iest in what are frankly very large sums necessary to prevent this kind of disruption. >> rose: let me turn to you, paul. in your piece i think
by in case the state government asks for them help. and now, picking up the pieces from sandy. staten island is a 60 square mile portion of new york city and it suffered some of the worst devastation from the storm. 19 of the city's deaths happened on staten island and today, i toured some of the hardest hit areas and spoke with residents just beginning to pick up the piecing of their shattered lives. this is quincy avenue and you still can't get close to house number 845. that's where barbara and her son, christopher, barely survived the storm. >> we stayed 11 hour onss on the roof. we kept yelling help to everyone we see. nobody was coming. nobody. >> their neighborhood, destroyed. the water rose feet in just minutes. they escaped with their lives, but suffered unimaginable loss. >> we were told the next day, looking for my sister, she was found dead in her apartment -- we have to get her from brooklyn and try to bury her. >> at the shelter, we saw about 250 people with no place to go and there are others still unaccounted for. congressman michael grim represents all of staten island. we w
20 years for the government as investigator for the whistle blower program and director of city purchasing department of public works and city administrator prior to his appointment and election as the city's first chinese american mayor and first asian elected to the office and please join us welcoming our mayor edward m lee. [applause] >> wow thank you very much. good evening everyone. well, it's my pleasure to be here with you tonight and to participate in the recognition and honor of our great leaders from the latino community, and i tell you there are so much construction that our latino community is providing the city in every way possible, the arts, law enforcement, restorative justice, all of the different services in the city, so i am excited to be here tonight and it's my personal pleasure to be joined here to have our democratic leader nancy pelosi also join in this community celebration. [applause] while we all know that latino heritage month is particularly importance to us in our city. it's the time when we can celebrate the independence and the self determination
of government is t neighborhood is both safe and clean. these two priorities have not beenh4 met. as supervisor, i will make sure that th"b bé are the priorities that we focus on. these are the priorities that are important. remember, if yourf house -- if your house needs a newisÑ roof, you you fix the roof first. as supervisor that's what i'm going to focus on, making sure that the neighborhood is both# >> hi-c5p< i'm eric mar and i represent district 1-rbgs the richmond on san francisco's board of super i'm running for reelection endorsed by the san francisco democratic party and i response to continue representing you for the next four in my first term i've worked across( restore theájá san francisco back on the right trac ei richmond more affordable for working families i help preserve rentk8 policies to prevent! %=9m of families with children, transformed the core net theater for housingéwn
and sidewalks every 10 years. the first job of government is t neighborhood is both safe and clean. these two priorities have not beenh4 met. as supervisor, i will make sure that we focus on. these are the priorities that are important. remember, if yourf house -- if don't redecorate. you fix the roof first. as supervisor, that's what i'm going to focus on, making sure > safe@ouc =' everyone. i'm eric mar and i represent district 1-rbgs the richmond on san francisco's board of super i'm running for reelection endorsed by the san francisco democratic party and i response to continue representing you for the next in my first term i've worked restore theájá san francisco back on the right ei richmond more affordable for working families i help preserve policiesñ to prevent! families with children, transformed the core net theater for housingéwn
people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle, and nasa. it's a program from nasa's office of centennial challenges. and it's challengin the best innovators in america to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 98 (some duplicates have been removed)

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